Domestic abuse “lasts 25 per cent longer” in rural areas

A newly published report paints “a shocking picture” of domestic abuse in rural Britain.

According to Captive & Controlled from the National Rural Crime Network, abuse and violence in rural areas continues on average for 25 per cent longer than that in towns and cities thanks to the relative isolation of its victims, who struggle to access support services and shelter spaces. They are half as likely as their urban counterparts to report their abuse at all.

Domestic violence in rural areas is more likely to fly under the radar, leaving victims “isolated, unsupported and unprotected” the reports declares, “failed by the system, services and those around them”.

There is a direct relationship between the extent of the isolation in particular rural areas, the risk of domestic violence and the difficulties of accessing support, according to Captive & Controlled. Abusers exploit isolation in order to increase their sense of control.

Residents of more urban areas who experience domestic violence are often able to move home with minimal disruption to their children’s education, whilst also keeping their jobs – but rural victims can find all three a significant struggle. The report highlights the often slow response times from local Police and the pressures exerted by close-knit but underserviced and underfunded country communities.

The report is based on the findings of an 18-month research project by the National Rural Crime Network. Representatives spoke to victims, Police officers and service delivery agencies.

Read Captive & Controlled here.

Our Adam Moghadas acts as a White Ribbon ambassador and works within the community to address issues of domestic abuse. If you, or your family or friends need advice or support in this area, please contact Adam, Tricia, Jeremy, Simon, Gail or Sue on 01223 443333.